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Coronavirus Daily Updates: What You Need To Know


June 5, 2020
Categories: Alerts, Advisories, Health

Our in-house operations teams are closely monitoring ongoing developments. Each day, we’ll continue to update this page with changes over the past 24 hours

 

June 5 – Updates include new changes to international country-specific dates regarding lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions. In the United States, updates include new changes to state-specific reopening measures. The US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has resumed in-person services.

June 4 – Updates include details on new cruise ship guidance from the CDC as well as new information regarding US reopening protocols. 

June 3 – Updates include additional changes to US reopening measures in several states. In Hawaii, quarantine requirements will be lifted for inter-island travellers on 16 June. Additional updates to international countries include new end dates for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions.

June 2 – Updates include new changes to US reopening information for New York and New Jersey. Several more changes have been added to international countries regarding new end dates for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions. 

June 1 – Updates include several changes to international country-specific end dates for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions. Additional US changes include new information on reopening measures and date changes for stay-at-home orders.

May 31 – Updates include additional changes to reopening protocols in the United States as well as international country-specific end dates for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions.

May 30 – Updates include additional additions to reopening measures in the United States. Los Angeles, California will begin further reopening of stores and restaurants.

May 29 – Updates include changes to reopening protocols in the United States. Massachusetts has canceled the 2020 Boston Marathon. Additional changes include international country-specific end dates for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions.

May 28 – Updates include new information on reopening protocols in the United States. In Las Vegas, casinos and resorts will begin opening on 4 June. Internationally, additional changes include new dates for country-specific lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions.

May 27 – Updates include additional reopening measures for US states. In Virginia, face masks are required in public indoor spaces and total US deaths have surpassed 100,000. The worldwide case total has grown to more than 5.7 million.

May 26 – Updates include new reopening information for several US states, as well as new information regarding date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions internationally. All passengers are now required to wear masks at New York City area airports. 

May 25 – In the United States, the Navajo Nation will implement a lockdown from 20:00 on 22 May until 05:00 on 25 May in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.

May 24 – In the United States, Vermont cancels all fairs and festivals for 2020.

May 23 – Updates include new reopening information for several US states. New York City will open an additional 13 miles of streets to help social distancing during Memorial Day weekend.

May 22 – Updates include additional changes to stay-at-home orders and reopening protocols in the United States, as well as new information regarding date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions internationally.

May 21 – Updates include more changes to reopening information for several US states. Total cases in the United States approaches 1.6 million, with nearly 95,000 deaths. 

May 20 – Updates include new changes to US reopening protocols as well as end date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions for several international countries. The suspension of nonessential travel between the US and Canada and the US and Mexico has been extended to 21 June. 

May 19 – Updates include new information on reopening protocols in the United States. Massachusetts and Washington D.C. to require face coverings on all public transit.

May 18 – Updates include additional changes for stay-at-home orders and reopening protocols in the United States as the US death total nears 100,000. 

May 17 – Updates include more changes to reopening protocols and stay-at-home orders in the United States.

May 16 – Updates include several changes to stay-at-home order dates in the United States. Delaware to require face masks for all residents.

May 15 – Updates include new reopening information for several US states, as well as end date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions for several international countries.

May 14 – Updates include new changes to dates for stay-at-home orders in the United States, as well as several additions to reopening protocols. New York City will open additional streets to aid in social distancing.

May 13 – Updates include additional protocols for states reopening in the United States and date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions for several international countries. 

May 12 – Updates include more changes to reopening protocols for US states. In California, many beaches across the state are reopening.

May 11 – Updates include current information on stay-at-home orders and reopening protocols for US states, as well as updated end date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions for several international countries.

May 10 – Updates include changes to reopening protocols in the United States and details on which countries are easing restrictions worldwide. In the US, total deaths surpass 80,000. 

May 9 – US states continue to make new changes to reopening protocols. In California, all registered voters will use a mail-in ballot for the November election.

May 8 – Updates include new changes to reopening protocols for 15 different US states, plus several changes to stay-at-home order dates. 

May 7 – Updates include new changes to reopening protocols in California, Oklahoma and Vermont and updated end date changes for lockdowns, flight and entry restrictions for several countries other than the United States.

May 6 – Updates include new changes to reopening measures for several US states. Death totals in the US have surpassed 70,000.

May 5 – Updates include new changes for reopening protocols for several more US states, as well as changes to stay-at-home order dates.

May 4 – Updates include more changes to stay-at-home order dates and reopening protocols for 15 different US states. Massachusetts to make face coverings required for all residents.

May 3 – Updates include several new changes to reopening protocols for various US states.

May 2 – Updates include new changes to reopening protocols for several US states.

May 1 – Updates include new changes to stay-at-home order dates and reopening protocols for several US states. New York City suspended nightly subway service from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.

April 30 – Updates include new changes to reopening protocol for more than 10 different US states. Rhode Island cancels all large events through the summer and total deaths in the US surpass 60,000. 

April 29 – Updates include new changes to US stay-at-home orders for several states and new information for reopening protocol in North Dakota, Tennessee and West Virginia. 

April 28 – Updates include new reopening information for Colorado, Iowa and Ohio. New York cancels the presidential primary until further notice and total United States cases surpass one million.

April 27 – Updates include several updates related to reopening protocols in US states. In New York, all patients have been discharged from the USNS Comfort.

April 26 – Changes made to reflect updated restrictions and reopening protocols in US states.

April 25 – Updates include new US restrictions.

April 24 – Updates include changes to US state-specific restrictions and details on reopening. Minnesota and Rhode Island close schools through the end of the academic year.

April 23 – Updates include details on new US entry restrictions regarding the suspension of aliens as immigrants. Additional states detail plans and dates to reopen and Massachusetts closes schools through the end of the academic year.

April 22 – Updates include new state-specific restrictions as total cases in the United States surpass 820,000 and deaths near 46,000.

April 21 – Updates include new changes to state-specific restrictions, including dates that some businesses are expected to reopen in Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee.

April 20 – Updates include new changes to restrictions within the United States. Face masks are now mandatory in public until further notice in Hawaii, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. New York will begin aggressive statewide antibody testing for coronavirus.

April 19 – Updates include several changes to state-specific restrictions in the United States. Marinas, boatyards and marine manufacturers in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York will be allowed to open for personal use as long as strict social distancing and sanitation protocols are followed. Florida, Utah, Washington D.C. and Wisconsin close schools for the remainder of the year.

April 18 – Updates include more restrictions for several US states. Iowa, Illinois, Maryland and Texas close schools for the remainder of the school year.

April 17 – Updates include new changes to United States restrictions. New Hampshire closes schools for the remainder of the school year and New Jersey closes public schools until at least 15 May.

April 16 – Several US states now require masks or face coverings in public spaces, as well as on public transportation. Tennessee closes schools until the remainder of the academic year and Los Angeles, California will not allow sporting events or concerts until 2021.

April 15 – Updates include changes to US restrictions. In Louisiana, the presidential primary election will be moved to 1 July. In Mississippi, all schools will remain closed for the remainder of the academic school year and frontline health care workers at long-term care facilities in New Hampshire will receive a weekly stipend.

April 14 – World totals for cases nears two million, as the death total surpasses 120,000. In the US, Louisiana schools will remain closed through the end of the academic year and all paitents checking in to Seattle's three largest hospitals will be tested for coronavirus.

April 13 – Updates include changes to US restrictions. A temporary hospital facility will be built in Atlanta at the Georgia World Congress Center and an executive order in New York was signed to expand the number of people who are eligible for the coronavirus antibodies test.

April 12 – Updates include new US changes as counties in Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania require public transit drivers to wear masks. All schools in New York will remain closed for the remainder of the academic school year.

April 11 – Updates include changes to US state-specific restrictions for California, Connecticut, Kentucky, Maryland and Vermont.

April 10 – Updates include new changes to US restrictions, as several states close schools for the remainder of the academic year. Disaster declarations in Alaska and Idaho are approved and in Florida, drive-thru coronavirus testing will be available at the Daytona Speedway.

April 9 – Updates include several changes to US state-specific restrictions. Vermont's disaster declaration is approved and all essential grocery stores and pharmacies in New Jersey must limit customers in their stores to 50% of the current approved capacity. Additional resources also added for coronavirus information.

April 8 – Updates include additional images depicting case totals and locations throughout the world and within the United States (see below). Cases in the US surpass 400,000 and schools in two more states close for the remainder of the academic year.

April 7 – Updates include new changes to country-specific formatting (see below). In the United States, all residents of Los Angeles, California can apply for coronavirus testing, as the county urges residents to skip grocery shopping until 13 April. Colorado and Pennsylvania ask residents to wear a mask when leaving home.

April 6 – Updates include changes to restrictions and measures for several countries.

April 5 – Updates include changes to restrictions and measures for several countries, including updates to lockdown and curfews.

April 4 – Updates include changes to restrictions and measures for several countries. Missouri and Alabama issue state-wide stay at home orders and disaster declarations are approved for Arkansas and New Hampshire.

April 3 – Updates include updates to restrictions and measures for several countries. In the United States, Ohio, Oklahoma and Tennessee issue or expand state-wide stay at home orders and the Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee moves to the week of 17 August.

April 2 – Updates include new restrictions and measures added for Curacao, Saba, Sint Eustatius and Sint Maarten, as well as several other countries. Florida, Georgia and Nevada issue state-wide stay at home orders and North Dakota's disaster declaration has been approved.

April 1 – Updates include new changes to country specific restrictions for several countries. In the United States, the National Guard will be deployed to assist at long-term health care facilities in Georgia and Maine and Texas issue state-wide stay at home orders.

March 31 – Updates include several changes to country-specific entry and other restrictions, as well as updates for government imposed flight restrictions. Arizona, Virginia and Washington D.C. issue state and district-wide stay at home orders.

March 30 – Updates include changes to restrictions and measures for several countries. In the US, Maryland issues a state-wide stay at home order and travelers entering Florida by car will be stopped and screened.

March 29 – Updates include new restrictions for several countries, US President Trump approves disaster declarations for 10 states and two territories and Kansas and Rhode Island issue state-wide stay at home orders.

March 28 – Updates include new restrictions and measures for Suriname as well as updates to several other countries. US states Alaska and North Carolina issue state-wide stay at home orders.

March 27 – Updates include new additions to country-specific restrictions and measures for several countries. Governors from two more US states ask for federal disaster declaration assistance and Montana and New Hampshire issue state-wide stay at home orders.

March 26 – Updates include new restrictions and measures for Dominica, in addition to updates for several other countries. Three more US states issue state-wide shelter in place or stay at home orders.

March 25 – Updates include new and expanded visual graphs for coronavirus cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide, several updates to country-specific restrictions and additional measures by several US states.

March 24 – Updates include several changes to country-specific restrictions and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide. After months of stringent lockdowns, several Chinese provinces have lowered their emergency response measures and manufacturing activities are resuming. In the United States, 16 states issue state-wide, county or city-specific stay at home orders.

March 23 – Updates include new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide, several US states issue state-wide or city specific stay at home orders and President Trump announces federal medical stations and various medical supplies will be sent to California, New York and Washington after the White House approves requests for federal disaster declaration.

March 22 – Updates include several changes to country-specific entry and other restrictions and worldwide total cases surpass 300,000.

March 21 – Updates include additional entry and other restrictions for the British Virgin Islands (BVI) and several other countries and US states including Connecticut, Illinois, New York and New Jersey issue stay at home orders. 

March 20 – Updates include additional restrictions and measures added for Guinea-Bissau and Tuvalu, the US Department of State suspends routine visa services at all US Embassies and Consulates worldwide, recommending US citizens abroad in countries where commercial departure options are available make immediate arrangements to return to the US. Totals are updated for cases, recoveries and deaths worldwide.

March 19 – Updates include new restrictions and measures for eight countries including Angola, Anguilla, Bermuda, Falkland Islands, Greenland, Liechtenstein, São Tomé and Príncipe and South Sudan, reports suggest that the US DoS is preparing to raise the Global Travel Advisory to Level 4 “do not travel” and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

March 18 – Updates include additional restrictions and measures for Aruba, Brazil, Central African Republic and Nicaragua, as well as several changes to other countries and new numbers for cases, deaths and recoveries as worldwide total cases now exceed 200,000.

March 17 – Updates include new country-specific restrictions for 12 new countries, including Belarus, Cayman Islands, Eswatini, The Gambia, Libya, Mauritania, Montserrat, Namibia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, Uruguay and Zimbabwe, as well as additional updates to several other countries and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

March 16 – Updates include new restrictions Andorra, Sudan and Venezuela, as well as several additional updates to others countries and state-by-state restrictions for the United States, as well as updated totals for cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 15 – Updates include new restrictions for Syria as well as several other changes to country-specific restrictions and government imposed flight restrictions and new totals for worldwide cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 14 – Updates include new restrictions for Guinea as well as several other changes to country-specific restrictions and government imposed flight restrictions and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

March 13 – Updates include additional country-specific restrictions for 14 new countries, including Bosnia and Herzegovina, Costa Rica, Cuba, Djibouti, Ghana, Guyana, Honduras, Latvia, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, North Macedonia and Paraguay. Nepal cancels all climbing permits until 30 April and WHO says Europe is now the epicenter of the outbreak.

March 12 – Updates include new country specific restrictions for 10 new countries, including Argentina, Bolivia, Botswana, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Montenegro, Panama, Turks and Caicos and South Africa, new totals for cases and deaths, changes to government imposed flight restrictions and the WHO declares the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic.

March 11 – Updates include country specific restrictions and measures for eight new countries, including Algeria, Burkina Faso, Chile, Comoros, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malta and Moldova, along with additional flight status and restriction changes for several other countries, as well as new totals for deaths, cases and recoveries.

March 10 – Updates include new country specific restrictions and measures for an additional seven countries, including Albania, Benin, Burundi, Chad, Cote D'Ivoire, Haiti and Serbia, along with several other new developments, details on the country-wide lockdown in Italy through 3 April and new numbers for cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 9 – Updates include several new country-specific changes to restrictions and measures including, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, French Polynesia, Italy, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Uganda and Vietnam, as well as new totals for worldwide cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 8 – Updates include new U.S. guidance for Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan, updates to restrictions for Malaysia, El Salvador, the United States and the Maldives, as well as information on lockdowns and lockdown measures in Italy.

March 7 – Updates include a note case numbers, as well as new restrictions and measures for Lesotho, Peru, Togo and Tunisia, in addition to several other country-specific updates.

March 6 – Updates include new restrictions and measures for nine new countries, additional changes in restrictions and flight statuses for several countries and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 5 – Updates include significant changes in restrictions and measures for several countries, including new additions for Cyprus, Ecuador, the Palestinian Territories, Senegal and Uzbekistan, as well as updated cases, death and recovery totals.

March 4 – Updates include changes to country-specific restrictions, measures and flight statuses for several countries, as well as new restrictions for Angola, Romania and San Marino and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

March 3 – Updates include new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries, new country-specific restrictions for China, Canada, Georgia, India, Kuwait, Nepal and Pakistan and the U.S. CDC advises institutes of higher education to consider postponing or cancelling upcoming student foreign exchange programs.

March 2 – Updates include a new visual featuring net active cases worldwide, updated country-specific restrictions for Georgia, HM Government of Gibraltar, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Qatar and Tajikistan, as well as new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries.

March 1 – Updates include additional country-specific guidance from the U.S. government, new flight status updates and/or restrictions for Armenia, Grenada, Kazakhstan and Qatar, as well as new totals for worldwide cases, deaths and recoveries.

February 29 – Updates include new restrictions and measures for Azerbaijan, French Polynesia, Georgia, Lithuania, Lebanon, Qatar and Tajikistan, several new flight status changes, the U.S. DoS and CDC raise travel advisory levels for Italy and new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

February 28 – Updates include several new restrictions and flight status updates, new country-specific guidance from the U.S. government and updated totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

February 27 – Updates include new restrictions and flight status updates for several countries, new cases, deaths and recovery totals, with the number of new cases reported outside China exceeding the number of new cases reported in China for the first time and the World Health Organization says the rest of the world and not China, is now WHO's "greatest concern."

February 26 – Updates include several changes regarding visa application centers for a variety of countries, new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries and the U.S. CDC notes the potential public health threat posed by COVID-19 to the U.S. is high.

February 25 – Updates include new restrictions and flight status changes for China, Bahrain, Bulgaria, Hong Kong, India, Kuwait, Spain, Turkey and UEA, as well as new totals for cases, deaths and recoveries.

February 24 – Updates include country-specific border closings and/or new restrictions for Afghanistan, Bahrain, Hong Kong, Jordan, North Korea, South Korea, Qatar, Tajikistan, Taiwan, Turkey and UAE, as well as updated case and death totals worldwide.

February 23 – Updates include significant changes to country-specific restrictions and measures for India, Italy, Iran, Norway, Pakistan, Slovakia, Slovenia and Turkey, as well as updated figures for cases, deaths and recoveries.

February 22 – Updates include new additional restrictions for Armenia, Australia, Italy, Israel and South Korea, as well as new numbers for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

February 21 – Updates include Global Rescue coronavirus quarantine policies, additional restrictions for Italy, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, North Korea, South Korea and Mongolia, flight status updates for Georgia, India and the UK, new evacuation plans for Ukraine, an update on the Diamond Princess cruise ship and new case, death and recovery totals worldwide.

February 20 – Updates include developments surrounding passengers disembarking from the Diamond Princess cruise ship, new country-specific restrictions for Iran, Macau, South Korea and Taiwan, new case, death and recovery totals and flight status changes for Egypt, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

February 19 – Updates include new evacuation plans for passengers aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship, additional country-specific restrictions and updated case, death and recovery totals worldwide.

February 18 – Updates include new restrictions and flight status updates for 24 different countries, as well as updated totals for cases, deaths and recoveries worldwide.

February 17 – Updates include 14 Americans aboard the Diamond Princess evacuated, additional flight status updates for Thailand, India and Brunei, new restrictions and measures for Cambodia and Malaysia and updated totals for cases, deaths and recoveries.

February 16 – Updates include new announcements from Hubei Province officials, several changes to country-specific flight status and evacuation plans, updated case, death and recovery totals and reports of two Boeing 747s landing in Tokyo to evacuate Americans aboard the Diamond Princess.

February 15 – Updates include additional lockdowns for Jingmen and Wuhan, updated case, death and recovery totals and reports of the U.S. government chartering a plane to evacuate U.S. nationals aboard the Princess Cruise ship in Yokohama.

February 14 – Updates include new country-specific restrictions Turkmenistan, Singapore, Russia, China and the Philippines, several new flight status changes and the first group of evacuees released from quarantine in France. New totals for case numbers, deaths and recoveries are also included.

February 13 – Updates include new country-specific restrictions for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sierra Leone and Vietnam, as well as additional restrictions for Hubei and updated totals for cases and deaths.

February 12 – Updates include Airbnb suspending bookings in Beijing until 30 April, new country-specific restrictions for Fiji, several flight status updates and new totals for cases and deaths.

February 11 – Updates include the total number of people who have recovered from coronavirus worldwide, new restrictions and measures for Gabon, South Korea and Thailand, several new country-specific flight status updates and new totals for cases and deaths.

February 10 – Updates include additional restrictions and other measures from the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and National Health Service, China's changes to the definition of "confirmed" cases and new totals for worldwide cases and deaths. 

February 9 – Updates include date modifications for country-specific restrictions and measures, as well as updated totals for cases and deaths. 

February 8 – Updates include extended dates for country-specific restrictions and measures, the EU considers a "harmonized approach" for issuing visas to Chinese nationals and updated case and death totals. 

February 7 – Updates include additional evacuation-related developments for the United States new restrictions and measures for Hong Kong and the Philippines, an update on the Princess Cruise ship in Yokohama and new case and death totals by location. 

February 6 – Updates include new death totals and case numbers, additional restrictions, measures and evacuation plans for Tianjin, Zhejiang and several countries, including Australia, Brunei, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Morocco, Netherlands, North Korea and New Zealand.

February 5 – Updates include additional restrictions, flight updates and evacuation plans for Bangladesh, Hong Kong, Jordan, Russia, South Korea, the UK and Uzbekistan, as well as new case locations and death totals.

February 4 – Updates include new case locations and death totals and country-specific restrictions, flight status updates and evacuation plans for several new countries.

February 3 – Updates include additional evacuation developments, new case numbers and death totals and country-specific restrictions for Bangladesh, Czech Republic, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan,  Maldives, Pakistan, Russia, Solomon Islands and Taiwan.

February 2 – Updates include the first recorded death outside of mainland China, Lunar New Year holiday break extensions, new evacuation plans for the EU, Princess Cruises restrictions, updated case and death totals and country-specific restrictions for New Zealand, South Korea and the U.S.

February 1 – Updates include information on Hubei lockdowns, additional evacuation plans for Egypt and Sri Lanka, several new flight restrictions, updated case and death totals and country-specific restrictions for Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Iran, the UK and the U.S.

January 31 – Updates include the World Health Organization (WHO) declaring “a public health emergency of international concern,” new case location and death totals, updated evacuation plans for Mongolia and Canada as well as additional country-specific restrictions for American Samoa, Italy, Israel, Mongolia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the U.S., the UK and Trinidad and Tobago.

January 30 – Updates include updated case locations and death totals, evacuation plans for the European Union, New Zealand and Germany, as well as new airline flight restrictions and country-specific restrictions for Italy, Russia and Northern Mariana Islands.

January 29 – Updates include reports of a possible vaccine, additional evacuation plans for Australia, United Kingdom, Italy, South Korea and Turkey, as well as updated case locations and death totals and new restrictions for Hong Kong, Kazakhstan and Papua New Guinea.

January 28 – Updates include additional evacuation plans from Wuhan, new country-specific restrictions for Tibet, Philippines, Russia, Hong Kong and the U.S., as well as new case location and death totals.

January 27 – Updates include new country-specific restrictions for China, France, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Macau, Mongolia, Spain, Singapore United Kingdom and the U.S. Additional airport measures and updated outbreak locations, cases and deaths.

January 26 – The U.S. Department of State (DoS) is making arrangements to relocate its personnel stationed at the U.S. Consulate General in Wuhan to the United States. Full details below.

 

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The new strain (COVID-19) comes from the same family of viruses that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

The virus is transmitted between humans through respiratory droplets, though it may spread through other modes of transmission. Individuals can spread the virus before they develop symptoms. The most severe cases typically develop in those over the age of 60 who have additional medical conditions. The virus’ mortality rate is disputed.

It appears that COVID-19 rates of infection are leveling off in China while spiking in other places such as Iran, Europe, South America, North America, and Africa. A WHO official said on 27 February that the rest of the world—not China—is now WHO’s “greatest concern.” On 11 March, the WHO declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. On 13 March, the WHO said that Europe is now the outbreak’s epicenter.

United States Government Guidance

On 19 March, DoS raised the Global Travel Advisory to Level 4 “do not travel” abroad under any circumstances. The advisory recommends that US citizens abroad in countries where commercial departure options are available should make immediate arrangements to return to the US, or else risk remaining abroad for an indefinite period. DoS also announced that regular passport services are suspended, with services only offered for “life-or-death” emergencies. On 20 March, DoS announced it suspended routine visa services at all US Embassies and Consulates worldwide.

US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) resumed in-person services on 4 June. Further information is available here.

CDC Cruise Ship Guidance

The CDC “No Sail” order for cruise ships to/from US ports will expire on 24 July. The CDC has established color coded criteria for classification of cruise ships during the no sail period:

  • Cruise ships are assigned "green" status if they have had no confirmed COVID-19 cases or similar illnesses for 28 days.
  • Cruise ships are assigned “yellow" status if they have suspected cases and are awaiting test results.
  • Cruise ships are assigned "red" status if they have confirmed COVID-19 cases or similar illnesses during the past 28 days.
  • Crew transfers and repatriation via commercial means are now allowed on green ships but not on yellow or red ones.

Further information is available here.

Repatriation Options

The US and other countries continue to explore repatriation options for citizens trapped abroad. We recommend that travelers and expatriates contact their embassies for the latest information.

Eventual Ease of Travel Advisories and Restrictions

  • For US Travelers: When CDC and DoS begin to change travel advisories levels, they will likely do so on a country by country basis, taking a number of factors into consideration including COVID-19 infection rates in the destination country, testing/reporting status, quality of medical care, regional rates of infection, and the potential for travelers to bring coronavirus back into the US.
  • Destination countries will continue to impose various levels of restrictive measures in an attempt to keep infection and reinfection rates low.

References

The following sources provide additional information related to guidlines and advice for the general public, as well as US Department of State travel advisory information and two sources for case tracking.

Outbreak Locations

On 26 February, the number of new cases reported outside China exceeded the number of new cases reported within China for the first time.

To date, there are more than 6 million total coronavirus cases worldwide.

 

  Cases Deaths
China Total 84,618 4,645
Non China Total 6,643,919 389,032
World Total 6,728,537 393,677

 


Trends for COVID-19Coronavirus Numbers_Trends for Novel CoronavirusNet Active Cases WorldwideCoronavirus Numbers_Total World Cases versus Recoveries and Deaths
Nations With The Most CasesOverall Cases since 22 JanuaryCoronavirus Numbers_Top 10 Nations- Overall Cases Overall Deaths since 22 JanuaryCoronavirus Numbers_Top 10 Nations- Overall Deaths sinceNet Active Cases as of TodayCoronavirus Numbers_Top 10 Nations- Net Active CasesChina vs. World: Cumulative % IncreaseCoronavirus Numbers_China vs. World- Cumulative % Increase

United States

Net Active Cases in the USCoronavirus Numbers_Total US Cases versus US Recoveries and US Deaths* Number of US recovered cases may not be reliable

Entry restrictions:

Effective 23:59 23 April and expiring on 23 June, entry into the US of aliens as immigrants is suspended.The suspension applies to aliens outside the US as of 23 April who do not have a valid immigrant visa as of 23 April and who do not have an official travel document other than a visa (e.g. a transportation letter, an appropriate boarding foil, or an advance parole document).

  • The suspension does not apply to:
    • Lawful permanent residents of the US.
    • Aliens seeking to enter the US on an immigrant visa as a physician, nurse, or other healthcare professional.
    • Medical researchers who will work to combat the spread of COVID-19.
    • Accompanying or following spouses and unmarried children under 21 of any such alien.
    • Aliens applying for a visa to enter the US pursuant to the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program.
    • Aliens who are the spouses of a US citizen.
    • Aliens under 21 who are the child of a US citizen, or prospective adoptees seeking to enter the US pursuant to the IR-4 or IH-4 visa classifications.
    • Aliens whose entry would further important US law enforcement objectives.
    • Members of the US Armed Forces and spouses and children of a member of the US Armed Forces.
    • Aliens seeking to enter the US pursuant to a Special Immigrant Visa in the SI or SQ classification.
    • Aliens whose entry would be in the national interest.
  • The policy does not apply to those coming to the US temporarily, such as agricultural workers or students.

Authorities announced a 30-day ban on travel from Schengen-area countries, including Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and Ireland. The ban applies to foreign nationals who have visited these countries within 14 days and those who have transited through these countries. The ban does not apply to US citizens, permanent residents, their close family members, and certain other limited categories of visa holders. Those returning to the US from these countries should self-isolate for 14 days.Foreign nationals who have traveled to Iran or mainland China within 14 days are barred from entry. US citizens who have been to mainland China within 14 days may enter but will be redirected to the airports listed below. Heightened screening is in place for arrivals from South Korea. Authorities suspended nonessential travel between the US and Canada and the US and Mexico, extended to 21 June.

Other restrictions:
Authorities declared a national emergency on 13 March. US President Donald Trump said on 16 March that there are no plans for a nationwide curfew or quarantine. The Administration urges all Americans to social distance. Major cruise lines including Carnival, Royal Caribbean, Norwegian, and MSC have suspended sailing operations to and from US ports since 14 March.

Government imposed flight restrictions:
Arrivals who traveled to any of the countries in the Schengen area, Iran, or mainland China within 14 days will need to rebook flights through one of the following airports:

  • John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), New York
  • Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Illinois
  • San Francisco International Airport (SFO), California
  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), California
  • Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA), Washington
  • Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), Hawaii
  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL), Georgia
  • Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), Virginia
  • Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), New Jersey
  • Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), Texas
  • Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (DTW), Michigan
  • Boston Logan International Airport (BOS), Massachusetts

Domestic travel restrictions:

Amtrak is cutting its frequency on the Northeast Corridor by 60 percent of its typical weekday schedules between Boston, New York, and Washington, D.C. in response to lower demand. Northeast Regional trains will continue to operate but at significantly lower frequencies. Routes in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New York, and Vermont will operate on a Saturday schedule from 16 March.

To view state specific restrictions click below

VIEW U.S. RESTRICTIONS
Map of United States coronavirus cases

Legend: Falling | About the Same | Slowly Rising | Rising Quickly | Few or no cases

*Map courtesy of the New York Times
RestrictionsWorld Map with Coronavirus Cases*Map courtesy of the New York Times

To view country specific restrictions click below

VIEW INTERNATIONAL RESTRICTIONS

A note for the country restrictions matrix: The category of “Lockdowns, Curfews, or Stay‐at‐Home Orders” includes any government‐imposed measure that grants authority to security personnel to prevent people from leaving the home, bans nonessential movement, restricts entry or exit from certain areas, limits the use of private transportation, or imposes other restrictions on movement. Not included in this category are measures such as closures of parks or certain businesses, bans on mass gatherings, and “safer‐at‐home” orders which are not enforced.

Signs and Symptoms of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The majority of cases related to this coronavirus outbreak have reported fever, cough and respiratory difficulties (distress, rapid breathing and shortness of breath).General symptoms related to coronavirus infection can also include, but are not limited to

  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • Loss of smell and/or taste
  • Diarrhea
  • Aches and pains
  • General feeling of being unwell

Medical Advice for Travelers

Avoid contact with sick people. Avoid animals (alive or dead), animal markets and products that come from animals (such as uncooked meat).Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.Older travelers and those with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease.

Our Coronavirus Quarantine Policies

In an attempt to control the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, several countries including the U.S. are enforcing a mandatory 14-day quarantine for travelers who may have been exposed to the virus.The Global Rescue Intelligence team monitors the outbreak closely and provides this daily report that includes precautions and efforts by various countries to control the spread of the virus within their borders.Some nations have begun to quarantine all travelers arriving from any countries that have confirmed cases.Global Rescue recommends before departure, travelers carefully review the coronavirus control policies of their destination and defer travel if there is a chance of being quarantined.Global Rescue strongly supports the international effort to control the spread of coronavirus. If a Global Rescue member is quarantined, Global Rescue will continue to provide medical and other advisory services. However, medical evacuation is not possible during a mandated quarantine period.

* Data based on press reporting and subject to further verification.


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